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Statement regarding fire compliance of wall & roof cladding materials

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Statement regarding fire compliance of wall and roof cladding materials

In light of recent tragic events relating to the Grenfell Tower, we at Prestige & Homeseeker feel it necessary to make a statement reassuring our customers that all wall and roof claddings used within our standard ranges are fully compliant with the applicable fire regulations, as set out in BS:3632:2015, the British Standard for residential park homes to which our homes are manufactured.

Within this standard it is stated that materials used for the external cladding of walls should have surfaces which have a minimum (fire) rating of Class 3 in accordance with BS 476-7:1997 (British Standard) or Euro Class D in accordance with BS EN 13501-1:2007+A1:2009 (European standard), where the lower the number/letter translates as the better the performance. These are essentially spread of flame tests which evaluate how a given material reacts to fire.

Below is a table listing our current standard external wall cladding types and respective fire classification of each. As it can be seen, all are either equal to or exceed the minimum required classification:

Cladding Type British Classification Equivalent European Classification
BS 476-7: 1997 BS EN 13501-1:2007+A1:2009
Canexel (Ridgewood, Ultraplank, Ced-R-Vue) Class 3 Class D
Cedar Class 3 Class D
Thermawood Class 3 Class D
Softwood Stained Class 3 Class D
Artefoam Class 3 Class D
Stipple on Magnesium Oxide Substrate

Limited combustibility

(exceeds class 0)

Class A2

It should also be noted in relation to exterior claddings that, in accordance with the Caravan Sites and Control of Development Act 1960 , it is required that there be a minimum clearance of 6 metres between the outer faces of external walls of each neighbouring structure. This excludes protruding wall elements which do not extend to the full height of the exterior wall, such as bay windows. At the discretion of some local authorities this distance may be reduced to 5.25metres for Class 1 claddings or above only, noting that for homes with more than one cladding type to the full height of the external wall (such as stippled park homes with cladding feature panels) the lesser performing of the two cladding types must be taken into account. In light of this, we are currently investigating alternative planked cladding types which provide superior fire protection (more to follow on this).

With regards to internal claddings to walls and ceilings, BS:3632:2015 states that materials used must have surfaces which are, in accordance with BS 476-7:1997, not less than Class 3, or at least Euro Class D in line with BS EN 13823:2010+A1:2014 and BS EN ISO 11925-2:2010. Again, all claddings used can be seen to be equivalent to or above this standard in the following table:

Cladding Type British Classification Equivalent European Classification
BS 476-7:1997 BS EN 13823:2010+A1:2014
BS EN ISO 11925-2:2010
Wallpaper on Plasterboard 0 B
Plasterboard Painted Limited Combustibility A2
MDF Painted 3 D
Rough Sawn Timber 3 D
Laminate 1 C
Tiled Non-combustible A1
Nuance Aquapanel 3 D
Vinyl Wrapped MDF 3 D
Smart Panel Painted 3 D

Also stipulated in BS:3632:2015 is the requirement for roof cladding materials to have a surface of fire resistance which is not less than classification “AC,” as defined in BS 476-3:2004, or classification Broof (t4) as defined in BS EN 13501-5:2004+A1:2009. Shown below are current roof covering options available and respective fire resistance classifications for each, once again both of which can be seen to meet current standards:

Cladding Type British Classification Equivalent European Classification
BS 476-3:2004 BS EN 13501-5:2004+A1:2009
Metrotile Sheet Tile AA Broof (t4)
Firestone Rubberguard FR Membrane AA Broof (t4)

We hope that this helps to clarify any queries relating to this important matter and welcome any further questions you may have on telephone number 01933 354000.